Tag Archive: Foundation for Pennsylvania Watersheds

Oct 10

Legacy of the Johnstown Flood

Remembering and learning from a historic tragedy: After a hard rain in the spring of 1889, a man-made lake burst through a dam. A wall of water three stories high ripped through Johnstown, Pennsylvania, destroying the town and killing more than 2,000 people. Jed Shugerman, a law professor at Fordham University, says attempts by townspeople …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/development/legacy-of-the-johnstown-flood/

Sep 27

So many fish, so little lake

Lake Erie has only about two percent of the water in the Great Lakes… But roughly half the fish. “During 40 of the 55 years between 1915 and 1970, Lake Erie produced more fish for human consumption than the other four Great Lakes combined,” says Jeff Reutter, former Director of Ohio Sea Grant. He says Lake …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/agricultural-runoff/so-many-fish-so-little-lake/

Sep 26

Inspiring girls to explore and protect streams

To earn a patch, some Girl Scouts are pulling on waders and going fly-fishing. Jessica Kester of Allegheny Land Trust helped bring the Trout Unlimited ‘STREAM Girls’ program to western Pennsylvania. She says participants not only go fishing. They look for other aquatic life, and learn which species – such as mayflies – are sensitive …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/sustainable-fisheries/stream-girls/

Sep 25

Riparian Buffers

A group of trees lining a babbling brook does more than make an idyllic picture. “It filters out nutrients, it holds soil in place, it adds shade when the trees have canopy to streams, and controls water temperature,” says Alysha Trexler with the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy. She says excess fertilizer from farm fields, dirt from rural …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/agricultural-runoff/riparian-buffers/

Sep 24

When a wet winter can be bad for water quality

For more than 100 years, coal was mined near Turtle Creek in western Pennsylvania. The river became polluted. “But that began to improve through the 1970s,” says Gary Smith of the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission. He says regulations and restoration projects led to cleaner water. Then last year a very wet winter filled abandoned mines …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/stormwater-management/turtle-creek/

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