Category Archive: Restoration & Conservation

Aug 02

A conservation effort that’s all it’s quacked up to be

In an agricultural area of Ann Arbor, Michigan, a group of organizations has been helping one landowner restore about a hundred acres back to its native state – a mix of grassland prairie and wetlands. Ducks Unlimited’s Jason Hill says restoring the wetlands required little more than removing dams and drainage systems. Hill: “The wetland seed …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/location-profiles/a-conservation-effort-thats-all-its-quacked-up-to-be/

Jul 29

Lake trout stocking

A fishy tale: In the 1800s, lake trout were abundant in Lake Superior. Then, in the early to mid 1900s… Hansen: “… populations began to decline rapidly.” That’s biologist Michael Hansen. He says overfishing and predatory invaders known as sea lampreys were to blame. By the time an effective way to control lampreys was discovered, …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/water-and-energy/lake-trout-stocking/

Jul 24

Protecting a Stream’s Comfort Zone

Using a three-zone buffer system around a stream can dramatically improve water quality. Zone in on this: When we destroy the ecosystem along a stream, we threaten water quality, displace wildlife, and increase the risk of flooding. Robert Tjaden of the University of Maryland says that a three-part buffer between the water and adjacent land …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/stormwater-management/protecting-a-streams-comfort-zone/

Jul 19

The Tale of the Lackawanna River

A community’s perception of their river had to be changed before they believed it was worth the effort to clean it up. Tune in to the tale: The Lackawanna River in Pennsylvania was once a dumping ground for coal waste and sewage. Mcgurl: “Oh, it was a dirty place! It was not some place you …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/water-treatment-2/the-tale-of-the-lackawanna-river/

Jul 18

Bioacoustics in the Great Lakes

A “sound” strategy for learning about fish: Aaron Rice, of Cornell’s Bioacoustics Research Program, tracks fish populations and behavior. He does it using sound. Rice: “The advantage of using sound as a survey method is that with digital recording technology that’s available now you can take a hydrophone, connect it to a essentially waterproof computer …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/water-and-energy/bioacoustics-in-the-great-lakes/

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