Category Archive: Restoration & Conservation

May 25

Mapping Endangered Fish in Illinois

Counting endangered fish is the first step towards protecting and improving their habitats. Dive in: One fish, two fish, red fish, blue fish…research biologist Phillip Willink, PhD, of the Shedd Aquarium is counting endangered and threatened fish. From there to here, from here to there, he’s also mapping their distribution throughout Chicagoland waters. He’s doing …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/sustainable-fisheries/endangered-fish-count/

May 23

Planting Trees for Tribs

Trees and riverbanks make a great match in the great state of New York. Dig in: A New York state program called Trees for Tribs is behind an effort to plant 30,000 trees along the state’s rivers and streams this year. Statewide coordinator Sarah Walsh says trees and shrubs reduce erosion and stabilize stream banks—preventing …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/stormwater-management/trees-for-tribs/

May 16

Protecting a Stream’s Comfort Zone

Using a three-zone buffer system around a stream can dramatically improve water quality. Zone in on this: When we destroy the ecosystem along a stream, we threaten water quality, displace wildlife, and increase the risk of flooding. Robert Tjaden of the University of Maryland says that a three-part buffer between the water and adjacent land …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/stormwater-management/protecting-a-streams-comfort-zone/

May 12

The Tale of the Lackawanna River

A community’s perception of their river had to be changed before they believed it was worth the effort to clean it up. Tune in to the tale: The Lackawanna River in Pennsylvania was once a dumping ground for coal waste and sewage. Mcgurl: “Oh, it was a dirty place! It was not some place you …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/water-treatment-2/the-tale-of-the-lackawanna-river/

May 08

A Salamander Hell-Bent on Clean Water

Hellbender salamander populations are declining because of poor water quality. Bend your ears to this: At more than one-foot long, the Hellbender salamander is the largest in North America. Flat, brown, and wrinkled, it has lived at the bottom of streams and ponds for millions of years. But that legacy is threatened, as hellbender populations shrink  Conservationist …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/marine-debris/a-salamander-hell-bent-on-clean-water/

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