Tag Archive: LAKE ERIE

Sep 12

Lake Erie’s Got the Algal Bloom Blues

This Great Lake has a problem that’s blooming out of control. Jam on this: Lake Erie touches upon Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York, and Canada, and provides drinking water to more than 11 million people. But phosphorus from fertilizer and sewage has increased cyanobacteria in the lake. Often called blue-green algae, it can produce toxic …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/stormwater-management/lake-erie-algal-blooms/

Jul 31

Get the Scoop on Too Much Poop

Cow manure in our water is a growing concern. . . Learn more: Farmers that raise livestock end up with a lot of manure, which they often spread on their fields as fertilizer. But in some cases, there’s just too much manure. “There’s so much built up on the ground that it runs off the surface, and …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/agricultural-runoff/get-the-scoop-on-too-much-poop/

Jul 17

Great Lakes Water on the Move

Lake Erie water is on the move! Listen up: In the Great Lakes, changes in wind and air pressure can spawn what are called seiches. “Imagine water in a sink or a bathtub sloshing back and forth—it bounces off one end, and then it bounces off the other, that’s what we call a seiche, it’s really …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/water-and-climate-change/great-lakes-water-on-the-move/

Jun 27

Deep Lakes, Deep Thoughts

Pondering the depth of the Great Lakes turns up some surprising revelations. Think on this: If you drop a stone into one of the Great Lakes, how far will it travel before it hits the bottom? The longest journey will be in Lake Superior, where the stone will cruise through the cleanest, clearest, and coldest …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/water-and-recreation/deep-lakes-deep-thoughts/

May 15

An Iconic Waterway

The Erie Canal introduced a new path to the west by connecting Albany to Buffalo. When the Erie Canal was built, it linked the Hudson River to Lake Erie, connecting Albany to Buffalo. That introduced a new path to the west and set the stage for increased trade.  Stewart: “Your other alternative was crossing over …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/development/an-iconic-waterway/