Category Archive: Biodiversity

Jul 13

Lake Ontario’s Best-Kept Secret – Sand Dunes

Scientists work to turn back the sands of time. There’s a stunning 17-mile section of dunes on the eastern shore of Lake Ontario in New York. Formed by glaciers, the dunes protect wetlands, creating habitat for birds and fish. Thirty years ago, unrestricted access led to damage by all-terrain vehicles and over-use. Today, trails and dune …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/development/lake-ontarios-best-kept-secret-sand-dunes/

Jul 10

Nature’s Water Filter

Move over, Brita, mother nature has its own water filter.  Explore the amazing mussel: Native mussels do some heavy lifting in a stream. “They feed on algae and plankton, and they help to purify that aquatic water system,” says Tamara Smith. That’s Tamara Smith of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. She says mussels have …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/green-infrastructure/natures-water-filter/

Jul 05

Mudpuppy Love

Squeaky salamanders that sound like dogs? Yes, they’re a thing—and they could be living at the bottom of a lake or river near you. Listen up: Say hello to the mudpuppy! Actually a splotchy-brown salamander with red feathery gills, this creature is the one of few salamanders that can actually make noise—and its noise is …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/creature-features/mudpuppy-love/

Jul 04

This (Wet)land Was Made for You and Me

The benefits of swamps, marshes, and other wetland wonderlands are worth singing about. Join the chorus: People once considered wetlands useless, as little more than soggy ground waiting to be drained and put to better use. Now we recognize wetlands as the croon-worthy areas they are. Besides being quiet places of safety and serene seclusion …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/stormwater-management/wetland-wonderlands/

Jun 09

Rock Snot: ItsNot a Joke (See What We Did There?)

Turns out, noses aren’t the only things that get snotty: Phlegm-like algae grosses out stream beds, too. Listen up: “Rock snot,” aka didymosphenia geminate, is an algae that most anyone can identify, thanks to its snot-like appearance. Although it’s not toxic, fast-growing rock snot can overgrow native algae that insects and fishes in the stream …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/creature-features/rock-snot/

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