Category Archive: Development

Mar 30

Butterflies and bogs

  In some northeastern wetlands, tiny brown butterflies called Bog Coppers feed on wild cranberry flowers. Their habitat requirements are very specific: “You not only need a bog, but you need the host plant, which is cranberry. They rarely move more than just a few meters away from their host plant,” says naturalist Jerry McWilliams. …

Continue reading »

Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/development/butterflies-and-bogs/

Mar 19

This (Wet)land Was Made for You and Me

The benefits of swamps, marshes, and other wetland wonderlands are worth singing about. Join the chorus: People once considered wetlands useless, as little more than soggy ground waiting to be drained and put to better use. Now we recognize wetlands as the croon-worthy areas they are. Besides being quiet places of safety and serene seclusion …

Continue reading »

Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/stormwater-management/wetland-wonderlands/

Mar 02

Water awareness through art

If you walk through Milwaukee, you may not notice if you pass a water cistern or cross a watershed boundary. But that may soon change, thanks to a project called ‘Watermarks.’ “It’s a series of physical markers that will serve as these marking points for where conversations around water can begin,” says project designer Aaron Asis. …

Continue reading »

Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/stormwater-management/water-awareness-through-art/

Feb 28

Human waste in water

In many parts of Milwaukee, stormwater is shuttled directly to rivers and Lake Michigan. Wastewater is dealt with separately and sent to a treatment plant for processing. But Sandra McLellan of the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, says the infrastructure is aging. “Many of the pipes that are taking waste from our homes that should be …

Continue reading »

Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/stormwater-management/human-waste-in-water/

Feb 18

From mills to meadows in Muskegon, Michigan

In the 1880s, Muskegon was known as the Lumber Queen of the Midwest. “Around Muskegon Lake where it enters Lake Michigan, there were 47 sawmills,” says Kathy Evans of the West Michigan Shoreline Regional Development Commission. She says other industries set up shop along the lake too, replacing natural lakefront ecosystems with a hardened shoreline dominated …

Continue reading »

Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/development/from-mills-to-meadows-in-muskegon-michigan/

Older posts «