Category Archive: Water and the Economy

Oct 08

When Sharing is Not Caring

Water water everywhere, but not a drop to spare say these 8 states: We’ve always been taught to share. But the eight Great Lakes states have a legal pact that limits the sharing of their most valuable resource: water. Molly Flanagan of the Alliance for the Great Lakes states, “Even though there’s a lot of water …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/industrial-and-corporate-water-use/when-sharing-is-not-caring/

Aug 28

Oil and water in the Straits of Mackinac

Every day, about 20 million gallons of oil travel through an underwater pipeline at the narrow passage that connects lakes Michigan and Huron. “There’s a lot of concern that this line could rupture,” says Mike Shriberg of the National Wildlife Federation, which helps organize the Great Lakes Business Network. It’s a coalition of more than …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/toxic-contamination/oil-and-water-in-the-straits-of-mackinac/

Aug 15

When Cutting Dam Losses Just Makes Cents

Sometimes removing a dam is a better “fix” than repair. Listen up: Let’s start with the good news. Thousands of dams across the U.S. harness rivers to reap a variety of goods and services. And here’s the economic but: As those dams age, their owners can face significant repair or maintenance costs. Brian Graber of …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/water-and-energy/when-cutting-dam-losses-just-makes-cents/

Jul 23

An Iconic Waterway

The Erie Canal introduced a new path to the west by connecting Albany to Buffalo. When the Erie Canal was built, it linked the Hudson River to Lake Erie, connecting Albany to Buffalo. That introduced a new path to the west and set the stage for increased trade.  Stewart: “Your other alternative was crossing over …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/development/an-iconic-waterway/

Jun 18

Praise for Native Grassland Prairies

Native prairie grasses aren’t just pretty—they also improve water quality across the Midwest. Listen up: How do we love native grassland prairies? Let us count the ways—or at least, let us recount the number one water-related way: When restored, native grassland prairies can improve water quality big-time, and help prevent erosion during heavy rains. Once …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/green-infrastructure/prairie-grasses/

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