Category Archive: Water and the Economy

May 15

An Iconic Waterway

The Erie Canal introduced a new path to the west by connecting Albany to Buffalo. When the Erie Canal was built, it linked the Hudson River to Lake Erie, connecting Albany to Buffalo. That introduced a new path to the west and set the stage for increased trade.  Stewart: “Your other alternative was crossing over …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/development/an-iconic-waterway/

May 05

Another Clean-Up for Mother Nature

Governments might be phasing out the use of microbeads, but nothing but time will remove the problem from the environment. Phase in to this: Microbeads are tiny bits of plastic most often made of polyethylene. Found in face scrubs and toothpastes, they wash down the drain, slipping through filters into waterways…where they’re eaten by birds …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/marine-debris/another-clean-up-for-mother-nature/

May 02

Less Lawn, More Native Landscaping

Lakefront landscaping is key to water quality. Listen up: You might like the look of a clean-cut lawn, but if you have lake front property, experts say not to mow all the way to the shoreline. Rozumalski: “The most important thing you can do for your lake is to create a buffer zone, and this …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/agricultural-runoff/less-lawn-more-native-landscaping/

Apr 06

Praise for Native Grassland Prairies

Native prairie grasses aren’t just pretty—they also improve water quality across the Midwest. Listen up: How do we love native grassland prairies? Let us count the ways—or at least, let us recount the number one water-related way: When restored, native grassland prairies can improve water quality big-time, and help prevent erosion during heavy rains. Once …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/green-infrastructure/prairie-grasses/

Feb 22

Fishy Business

How much sustainably caught fish comes out of the Great Lakes each year? We cast around for answers—and caught ’em. Listen up: Throughout history, people have been hooked on fishing the Great Lakes, from Native Americans in birch bark canoes to commercial fishermen in modern boats. A century ago, nearly 150 million pounds of fish …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/water-and-the-economy/fishy-business/

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