Category Archive: Creature Features

Jan 02

Backtracking Birds

Why shorelines are stopover sites:   Each spring and fall, tens of millions of birds migrate through the Great Lakes region. Jeffrey Buler of the University of Delaware says many species prefer to travel at night. In a recent study, he found that if birds were still out over the Great Lakes at sunrise, they …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/creature-features/backtracking-birds/

Dec 31

Lake trout stocking

A fishy tale: In the 1800s, lake trout were abundant in Lake Superior. Then, in the early to mid 1900s… Hansen: “… populations began to decline rapidly.” That’s biologist Michael Hansen. He says overfishing and predatory invaders known as sea lampreys were to blame. By the time an effective way to control lampreys was discovered, …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/water-and-energy/lake-trout-stocking/

Dec 28

A Super Highway for Aquatic Invaders

The system of locks and canals that allowed ships to bypass Niagara Falls suddenly created a path for invasive species. Tune in to this highway of info: When locks and canals began allowing ocean-going vessels to by-pass Niagara Falls, they did more than open new trade routes to the west. Suddenly… Campbell: “Things like sea …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/industrial-and-corporate-water-use/a-super-highway-for-aquatic-invaders/

Dec 19

Ciscoes: A Great Snack for Great Lakes Fish

A middle-of-the-food-web fish: Ciscoes were once abundant in the Great Lakes. But these native fish were depleted by overfishing, invasive species, and pollution. Ellen George, a grad student in the Cornell Department of Natural Resources, wants to see them come back. She says some of the invasive fish that replaced ciscoes in the food chain …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/sustainable-fisheries/ciscoes-a-great-snack-for-great-lakes-fish/

Dec 14

A Salamander Hell-Bent on Clean Water

Hellbender salamander populations are declining because of poor water quality. Bend your ears to this: At more than one-foot long, the Hellbender salamander is the largest in North America. Flat, brown, and wrinkled, it has lived at the bottom of streams and ponds for millions of years. But that legacy is threatened, as hellbender populations shrink  Conservationist …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/marine-debris/a-salamander-hell-bent-on-clean-water/

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