Category Archive: Creature Features

Feb 28

Mudpuppy Love

Squeaky salamanders that sound like dogs? Yes, they’re a thing—and they could be living at the bottom of a lake or river near you. Listen up: Say hello to the mudpuppy! Actually a splotchy-brown salamander with red feathery gills, this creature is the one of few salamanders that can actually make noise—and its noise is …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/creature-features/mudpuppy-love/

Feb 27

Invasion of the Bottom-Dwelling Gobies

Aggressive round goby fish are causing mayhem in the Great Lakes. Hook yourself up with the intel: There’s trouble in the Great Lakes, and plenty of it’s coming from a non-native, bottom-dwelling fish called the round goby. These fish hitched a ride in the ballast waters of ships and arrived in the lakes uninvited. This …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/creature-features/invasion-of-the-bottom-dwelling-gobies/

Jan 25

A “ruffe” road ahead for the Great Lakes

An aggressive little fish is threatening to disturb ecosystems throughout the Great Lakes. The Eurasian Ruffe is recognizable by its long spiny dorsal fin and frowning mouth. It’s native to Northern Europe and Asia, and made its first appearance in Lake Superior in the 1980s, probably after catching a ride on a freighter from Europe. …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/creature-features/a-ruffe-road-ahead-for-the-great-lakes/

Jan 02

Backtracking Birds

Why shorelines are stopover sites:   Each spring and fall, tens of millions of birds migrate through the Great Lakes region. Jeffrey Buler of the University of Delaware says many species prefer to travel at night. In a recent study, he found that if birds were still out over the Great Lakes at sunrise, they …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/creature-features/backtracking-birds/

Dec 31

Lake trout stocking

A fishy tale: In the 1800s, lake trout were abundant in Lake Superior. Then, in the early to mid 1900s… Hansen: “… populations began to decline rapidly.” That’s biologist Michael Hansen. He says overfishing and predatory invaders known as sea lampreys were to blame. By the time an effective way to control lampreys was discovered, …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/water-and-energy/lake-trout-stocking/

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