Category Archive: Water & Energy

Jul 23

When the water rises too high

The water level on Lake Ontario can be partially controlled by a dam on the Saint Lawrence River. But… “…only so much water can pass through that at a certain time,” says Lana Pollack, the U.S. Chair of the International Joint Commission. She says when there’s a lot of rain or snow melt, the lake …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/stormwater-management/when-the-water-rises-too-high/

Jul 20

When Cutting Dam Losses Just Makes Cents

Sometimes removing a dam is a better “fix” than repair. Listen up: Let’s start with the good news. Thousands of dams across the U.S. harness rivers to reap a variety of goods and services. And here’s the economic but: As those dams age, their owners can face significant repair or maintenance costs. Brian Graber of …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/water-and-energy/when-cutting-dam-losses-just-makes-cents/

Jul 19

Water Power: The Good, the Bad, and the Bubbly

Hydropower is one of the cleaner energy options, but that doesn’t make it perfect. Wade into this: Rushing, cascading water doesn’t just power epic rafting trips—fast-flowing water also creates hydropower. It goes something like this: A dam is built in a river, holding back the water to form a reservoir. When released, the force of …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/water-and-energy/hydroelectric-power/

Jul 09

Old Dams Die Hard

Deteriorating dam infrastructure is a “dam” shame. Listen up: Let’s face it: no dam lives forever. Many of the nation’s estimated 75,000 dams have been providing important services like hydropower or irrigation since the early 1900s—and their time for removal or serious repair has come. How do such sturdy structures crumble in the first place? …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/water-and-energy/environmental-impact-of-old-dams/

Dec 20

Fish Slides, Anyone?

Elevators and water slides for fish may sound straight out of Dr. Seuss—but they actually exist in Michigan. Listen up: Sturgeon go back to their home river to spawn. And for half the sturgeon in Lake Michigan, that means the Menominee River. But hydroelectric dams block the river, forcing the fish to lay their eggs …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/water-and-energy/fish-slides-anyone/

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