Sep 18

Going Against the Flow

Joel Brammeier Asian carp meeting

Restoring the original flow of the Chicago River could be the best way to keep invasive Asian carp out of the Great Lakes—listen up for the scoop: Chicago’s going against the flow…again. More than a century ago, the direction of the Chicago River was reversed to move the city’s wastewater away from Lake Michigan. The …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/stormwater-management/going-against-the-flow/

Sep 15

When Good Driveways Go Bad

Coal-tar sealants may protect your driveway—but they don’t protect water resources. Here’s the dirt: Driveways and parking lots are coated with a sealant to protect them. But the coating needs to be reapplied every two to three years because driving on it grinds it into dust. And that means as dust wears off, any given …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/green-infrastructure/when-good-driveways-go-bad/

Sep 14

Greener Gardens for the Win

Wanna nip gardening pollution in the bud? For tips on growing a truly green garden—listen up: If you grow your own flowers and vegetables, you’re probably eager to dig in already. But give yourself a moment to consider that how you garden affects water quality—especially when the fertilizers and chemicals enter storm drains or groundwater …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/stormwater-management/greener-gardens-ftw/

Sep 13

In Land We Trust

How can protecting the land help protect water resources? Listen up as we count the trusted ways— In a healthy watershed, the water passes through the land, which acts like a natural filter. So to protect water quality, it’s important to protect the land—and land trusts are one way to do it. A binding legal …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/agricultural-runoff/in-land-we-trust/

Sep 12

Lake Erie’s Got the Algal Bloom Blues

This Great Lake has a problem that’s blooming out of control. Jam on this: Lake Erie touches upon Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York, and Canada, and provides drinking water to more than 11 million people. But phosphorus from fertilizer and sewage has increased cyanobacteria in the lake. Often called blue-green algae, it can produce toxic …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/stormwater-management/lake-erie-algal-blooms/

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