Apr 20

Baby Beluga in the Deep Blue…River?

Beluga whales are found in the Saint Lawrence River—but their population is declining. Listen up: It sounds like a whale of a tale, but it’s not. Thirteen species of cetaceans can be found in the St. Lawrence River. “The St. Lawrence is an amazing area. The biodiversity out there is amazing,” says Robert Michaud, president …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/biodiversity/beluga-in-the-deep-blue-river/

Apr 19

Great Lakes Villains on the Move

Cue the scary music! If Asian carp barge into Lake Erie, Ohio’s tourism and travel industries are at stake. Listen up: Imagine 40-pound fish taking over a lake, and stealing food from smaller species. It may sound like a horror flick, but the threat of Asian carp is real—and breeding populations exist in rivers near the …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/water-and-recreation/villains-on-the-move/

Apr 18

How to Win at Clean Boating

Boaters, you can rock the boat in an entirely awesome way when it comes to keeping waterways clean. Listen up:  Are you one of the more than 80 million adults in the U.S. who take to the water each year in a boat, canoe, or kayak? Then catch this drift: Almost three hundred thousand miles …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/marine-debris/clean-boating/

Apr 17

Precision Farming for the Waterways’ Win

What does GPS positioning have to do with farming? Plenty, when it comes to reducing water and fertilizer use—listen up: The Midwest is renowned for both its bountiful farms and its access to the Great Lakes. But the two are sometimes at odds, considering that excess fertilizer can run off fields and pollute water resources. …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/stormwater-management/precision-agriculture/

Apr 16

Putting Down Native Roots

Landscaping with native plants can help stabilize the soil and protect water quality. Dig it: Trees and other plants are nature’s water purifiers. Their roots prevent erosion. And when it rains, they slow runoff, so it filters into the ground. But when landscaping for clean water, not all plants are equal. Cheryl Nenn of Milwaukee …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/agricultural-runoff/putting-down-roots/

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