Jan 22

Protecting a Stream’s Comfort Zone

Using a three-zone buffer system around a stream can dramatically improve water quality. Zone in on this: When we destroy the ecosystem along a stream, we threaten water quality, displace wildlife, and increase the risk of flooding. Robert Tjaden of the University of Maryland says that a three-part buffer between the water and adjacent land …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/stormwater-management/protecting-a-streams-comfort-zone/

Jan 21

An Iconic Waterway

The Erie Canal introduced a new path to the west by connecting Albany to Buffalo. When the Erie Canal was built, it linked the Hudson River to Lake Erie, connecting Albany to Buffalo. That introduced a new path to the west and set the stage for increased trade.  Stewart: “Your other alternative was crossing over …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/development/an-iconic-waterway/

Jan 20

The Tale of the Lackawanna River

A community’s perception of their river had to be changed before they believed it was worth the effort to clean it up. Tune in to the tale: The Lackawanna River in Pennsylvania was once a dumping ground for coal waste and sewage. Mcgurl: “Oh, it was a dirty place! It was not some place you …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/water-treatment-2/the-tale-of-the-lackawanna-river/

Jan 17

Bioacoustics in the Great Lakes

A “sound” strategy for learning about fish: Aaron Rice, of Cornell’s Bioacoustics Research Program, tracks fish populations and behavior. He does it using sound. Rice: “The advantage of using sound as a survey method is that with digital recording technology that’s available now you can take a hydrophone, connect it to a essentially waterproof computer …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/water-and-energy/bioacoustics-in-the-great-lakes/

Jan 16

Trees as Stormwater Managers

A growing solution to stormwater runoff: If you’ve stood under a tree to stay dry during a storm, you know that leaves and branches can slow or even stop raindrops. Ted Endreny of the State University of New York’s College of Environmental Science and Forestry says in a drizzle… Endreny: “The canopy can capture nearly …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/stormwater-management/trees-as-stormwater-managers/

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