Jul 17

Trees as Stormwater Managers

A growing solution to stormwater runoff: If you’ve stood under a tree to stay dry during a storm, you know that leaves and branches can slow or even stop raindrops. Ted Endreny of the State University of New York’s College of Environmental Science and Forestry says in a drizzle… Endreny: “The canopy can capture nearly …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/stormwater-management/trees-as-stormwater-managers/

Jul 16

Ciscoes: A Great Snack for Great Lakes Fish

A middle-of-the-food-web fish: Ciscoes were once abundant in the Great Lakes. But these native fish were depleted by overfishing, invasive species, and pollution. Ellen George, a grad student in the Cornell Department of Natural Resources, wants to see them come back. She says some of the invasive fish that replaced ciscoes in the food chain …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/sustainable-fisheries/ciscoes-a-great-snack-for-great-lakes-fish/

Jul 15

Floating Urban Islands

Floating gardens in the Chicago River provide new habitat for wildlife: For many years, Chicago’s rivers have been used for transportation and commerce… Damato: “…But now they should be used for habitat and interaction.” That’s Zachary Damato of the nonprofit Urban Rivers. His group is installing man-made floating wetlands in the Chicago River. They’re essentially …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/green-infrastructure/floating-urban-islands/

Jul 12

Less is More, When it Comes to Runoff…

Cities are using green infrastructure to meet EPA clean water standards. Listen up: Too much rain…and too many people using a lot of water can overwhelm aging stormwater systems. That can cause them to overflow and dump pollution into rivers. Instead of rebuilding systems or adding bigger pipes, many cities are turning to green infrastructure …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/stormwater-management/less-is-more-when-it-comes-to-runoff/

Jul 11

A Salamander Hell-Bent on Clean Water

Hellbender salamander populations are declining because of poor water quality. Bend your ears to this: At more than one-foot long, the Hellbender salamander is the largest in North America. Flat, brown, and wrinkled, it has lived at the bottom of streams and ponds for millions of years. But that legacy is threatened, as hellbender populations shrink  Conservationist …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/marine-debris/a-salamander-hell-bent-on-clean-water/

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