Category Archive: Water Treatment

Jun 26

Nitrates in Rural Wells

If well water is contaminated by fertilizer runoff, septic discharges, or animal waste, it could put babies at risk. Consider this: Nitrate is a natural chemical compound present in almost all water, but high levels in fertilizer runoff, septic discharges, or animal waste can leach into groundwater. If it gets into drinking water, it puts infants …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/agricultural-runoff/nitrates-in-rural-wells/

Jun 10

Swimming in Sewage

Sorry to have to break this to you, but sewage overflows are a thing. Plug your nose, then listen up: Here’s the raw deal: Many communities have combined sewer systems (CSS) that can overflow during rainstorms—sending raw sewage into rivers and lakes. Not a pretty picture. “A lot of these older cities like Chicago, and …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/stormwater-management/combined-sewer-overflow/

May 03

Crayons and Clean Water

The colorful side of water remediation. In Pennsylvania, abandoned coal mines have left a dirty legacy… thousands of miles of streams polluted by acid mine drainage. Wetlands can be used to treat the water. But in the process, they accumulate a lot of metal sludge that has to be removed – often at great expense. …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/toxic-contamination/crayons-and-clean-water/

Apr 02

Putting Down Native Roots

Landscaping with native plants can help stabilize the soil and protect water quality. Dig it: Trees and other plants are nature’s water purifiers. Their roots prevent erosion. And when it rains, they slow runoff, so it filters into the ground. But when landscaping for clean water, not all plants are equal. Cheryl Nenn of Milwaukee …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/agricultural-runoff/putting-down-roots/

Feb 06

Nature’s Water Filter

Move over, Brita, mother nature has its own water filter.  Explore the amazing mussel: Native mussels do some heavy lifting in a stream. “They feed on algae and plankton, and they help to purify that aquatic water system,” says Tamara Smith. That’s Tamara Smith of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. She says mussels have …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/green-infrastructure/natures-water-filter/

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