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May 28

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Protecting the Fruit of One’s Labor

By putting their property in a land trust, fruit farmers can protect water quality—and in turn, their own crops. Listen up:


It’s no coincidence that fruit farms flourish across the Great Lakes. And now, farmers are finding new ways to ensure they continue to do so.

Glen Chown, executive director of Grand Traverse Regional Land Conservancy, is a tireless advocate for farm land connection and water quality. (via GTRLC)

Glen Chown, executive director of Grand Traverse Regional Land Conservancy, is a tireless advocate for farmland preservation and water quality. (via GTRLC)

“The Lake Michigan fruit belt is a 200-mile stretch where you can grow fruits as well as anywhere in the world,” explains Glen Chown of the Grand Traverse Regional Land Conservancy, an organization that helps landowners legally and permanently protect their property.

He says cherries, peaches, blueberries, and apples all thrive in the microclimate created by the lake. And by putting farms in a land trust, fruit growers can ensure long-term protection from development while continuing to grow their crops.

The cherry on top? Permanent protection for the land equals greater resiliency for Lake Michigan and the surrounding watershed.

Hear More:

Listen to Glen Chown describe the impacts of fruit farms on water quality: trusted land leads to trusted fruit leads to “trusted” water!

Get schooled:

The fine print:

 

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.currentcast.org/stormwater-management/the-fruit-of-ones-labor/